Conference Presentations
(Selected, Peer-Reviewed) 

 

Digitizing Engagement: Jungian Archetypes, Facebook Users, and Implications for Student Engagement at Two-Year Colleges

Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona
Regina Deil-Amen, University of Arizona
Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, Claremont Graduate University
Manuel Sacramento González-Cánche, University of Georgia

Abstract

Social media technology has transformed the ways in which society things about relationships, connections, and affinity to others. In doing so, institutions of higher education have also begun to use social media in their everyday practices of marketing, recruiting, and engaging both socially and academically with college students. In effort to improve upon the professional practice of postsecondary faculty, staff, and administrators, this paper explores 14 archetypes of social media users and the implications for improving student engagement through the use of Facebook at two-year colleges.

Suggested Citation

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González-Cánche, M. (2013). Digitizing engagement: Jungian archetypes, facebook users, and implications for student engagement. Paper presented at the American Educational Researchers Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA.

+ download presentation

 

Toward New Ecologies for Higher Education: An exploration of political ecology and academic capitalism

Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona

Abstract

Current ecologies in higher education research have remained considerably focused on students and have had limited applicability beyond individual contexts. While these studies have assisted in understanding campus dynamics with regard to design, aesthetic, culture and student identity development, they have remained unused in attempts to evaluate institutions within larger ecological systems. As such, political ecology provides an alternative framework for analyzing postsecondary institutions, the least of which have been offered here. Further study is needed to better understand the ways in which this and other ecological assessments of colleges and universities can be conducted by scholars in the field.

Suggested Citation

Davis III, C.H.F. (2012). Toward new ecologies for higher education: An exploration of political ecology and academic capitalismPaper presented at theAssociation for the Study of Higher Education Annual Conference (ASHE), Las Vegas, NV.

+ download presentation 

 

In Search of Progressive Black Masculinities

Keon M. McGuireUniversity of Pennsylvania
Jonathan BerhanuUniversity of Wisconsin - Madison
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona
Shaun R. HarperUniversity of Pennsylvania

Abstract

This presentation was presented at the Council for Ethnic Participation at the 2012 Association for the Study of Higher Education conference and explores autocritography as a methodological intervention for investigating progressive Black masculinities among African American men.

Suggested Citation

Keon M. McGuire, Jonathan Berhanu, Charles H.F. Davis III, and Shaun R. Harper. "In Search of Progressive Black Masculinities" Association for the Study of Higher Education. Charlotte, NC. Nov. 2012.

+ download presentation

 

Voices for Progress: Intra-group dialogue and male engagement

Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona
Eddie Banks-CrossonSyracuse University

Abstract

Decades of research and practice have been aimed at the support of college women in an effort to make equitable their experiences in higher education. What has been missing is the need of college men to be supported in the development of more progressive understandings of themselves. To this end, intra-group dialogue has emerged as an effective model for engaging male students and developing their understandings of maleness and manhood. This presentation explores this research-based practice in-depth.

Suggested Citation

Davis III, C.H.F. & Banks-Crosson, E. (2012). Voices for progress: Intra-group dialogue and male engagement. National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Annual Conference, Phoenix, AZ.

+ download presentation 

 

How Does It Feel To Be the Problem: White graduate students experiences with racial tension

Keon M. McGuireUniversity of Pennsylvania
Jonathan BerhanuUniversity of Wisconsin - Madison
Connie ChangUniversity of California - San Diego
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona

Abstract

This paper presentation was at the 2011 National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Conference and problematizes the experiences of White graduate students with racial tension.

Suggested Citation

McGuire, K.M., Berhanu, J., Chang, C. and Davis III, C.H.F. (2011). How Does It Feel To Be the Problem: White graduate students experiences with racial tension. National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. Philadelphia, PA.

+ download presentation