Journal Articles
(Peer-Reviewed)

 

MULTIPLE MARGINALITIES OF AN IMMIGRANT BLACK MUSLIM WOMAN ON A PREDOMINANTLY WHITE CAMPUS

Keon M. McGuire, Arizona State University
Saskias CasanovaArizona State University
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Often scholarship concerning religion and spirituality overwhelmingly privileges White, male, Christian students’ perspectives and fail to interrogate the interplay of cultural, gender, and racial dynamics within these investigations. Even further, very few studies examine the experiences of those who occupy multiple marginalized social categories. Therefore, this study seeks to advance our collective knowledge by closely engaging the narrative of an individual case of a Black, Muslim, immigrant, female college student born in Saudi Arabia. Using intersectionality, particularly Collins’ matrix of domination, as the basis of the theoretical framework, we present findings that relate to how her gendered, religious, immigrant, racial, and ethnic identities influenced interactions across multiple communities and the strategies she used to navigate diverse educational spaces. 

Suggested Citation

McGuire, K. M., Casanova, S., & Davis III, C. H. F. (2016). Exploring the multiple marginality of a non-native born Black Muslim on a predominantly white campus. Journal of Negro Education, 85(3), 316-330

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A Critical Race Case Analysis of Black Undergraduate Student Success at an Urban University 

Shaun R. Harper, University of Pennsylvania
J. Edward SmithUniversity of Pennsylvania
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Presented in this article is a case study of Black students’ enrollment, persistence, and graduation at Cityville University, an urban commuter institution. We combine quantitative data from the University’s Office of Institutional Research and the U.S. Department of Education with qualitative insights gathered in interviews with students, faculty, and administrators. We then use tenets, theses, and propositions from Critical Race Theory to analyze structural problems that undermine persistence and degree completion, sense of belonging, and academic achievement for Cityville’s Black undergraduates.

Suggested Citation

Harper, S. R., Smith, J. E., & Davis III, C. H. F.  (2016). A critical race case analysis of Black undergraduate student success at an urban university. Urban Education, 52(1), 1-23 DOI: 10/1177/0042085916668956

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Social Media, Higher Education, and Community Colleges: A Research Synthesis and Implications for the Study of Two-Year Institutions

Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Pennsylvania
Regina Deil-AmenUniversity of Arizona
Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, Claremont Graduate University
Manuel Sacramento González CanchéUniversity of Georgia

Abstract

The boundaries between on-line and “real-world” communities are rapidly deteriorating, particularly for the generation of young people whose lives are pervaded by social media. For this generation, social media exchanges are a primary means of communication, social engagement, information seeking, and possibly, a central component of their identity and community-building. Given these realities, postsecondary educators should begin to seriously explore the potential to intentionally and strategically harness the power of these revolutionary transformations in technology use to better serve the needs of students to enhance their success. Therefore, this review of books, academic journals, higher education news, research reports, individual blogs and other online media on the use of social media technology (SMT) in higher education provides a baseline sense of current uses nationally, providing a descriptive overview of the social media phenomenon. Additionally, the review clarifies how colleges and college students use SMT and also challenges assumptions in two areas: how institutions can best exploit social media’s features and its impact on student outcomes. The review further provides a foundation to develop conceptual frameworks that would better capture the role and impact of SMT among colleges and college students, and community colleges in particular.

Suggested Citation

Davis III, C.H.F., Deil-Amen, R., Rios-Aguilar, C., & González Canché, M. S. (2014). Social media, higher education, and community colleges: A research synthesis and implications for the study of two-year institutions. Community College Journal of Research and Practice, 00: 1–14.

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In Search of Progressive Black Masculinities: Critical Self-Reflections on Gender Identity Development among Black Undergraduate Men

Keon M. McGuireUniversity of Pennsylvania
Jonathan BerhanuUniversity of Wisconsin, Madison
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Pennsylvania
Shaun R. HarperUniversity of Pennsylvania

Abstract

During the last several decades, research concerning the developmental trajectories, experiences, and behaviors of college men as ‘‘gendered’’ persons has emerged. In this article, we first critically review literature on Black men’s gender development and expressions within college contexts to highlight certain knowledge gaps. We then conceptualize and discuss progressive Black masculinities by relying on Mutua’s germinal work on the subject. Further, we engage Black feminist scholarship, both to firmly situate our more pressing argument for conceptual innovation and to address knowledge gaps in the literature on Black men’s gender experiences. It is our belief that scholars who study gender development and expressions of masculinities among Black undergraduate men could benefit from employing autocritography, and its built-in assumptions, to inform several aspects of their research designs. Autocritography is a critical autobiography that some Black pro-feminist men engage to invite readers into their gendered lifeworlds.

Suggested Citation

McGuire, K. M., Berhanu, J., & Davis III, C. H. F., & Harper, S. R. (2014). In search of progressive Black masculinities: Critical self-reflections on gender identity development among Black undergraduate men. Men and Masculinities, 17(3) 253-277.

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They (don’t) care about education: A counternarrative on Black male students’ responses to inequitable schooling

Shaun R. HarperUniversity of Pennsylvania
Charles H.F. Davis IIIUniversity of Arizona

Abstract

Presented in this article is a counternarrative concerning one particular message that is consistently reinforced in academic and public discourse about Black male students: they don’t care about education. Little is known about those who graduate from high school, enroll in college, and subsequently commit themselves to various career pathways in education fields (K-12 teaching and administration, the postsecondary professoriate, education policy, etc.). What compels these men to care so much about education, despite what is routinely reported in the literature regarding their gradual disinvestment in schooling? This question is explored in the article using data from 304 Black male undergraduates attending 209 colleges and universities across the United States. It counters longstanding perspectives on Black men’s oppositional responses to inequitable schooling.

Suggested Citation

Harper, S. R., & Davis III, C. H. F. (2012). They (don’t) care about education: A counternarrative on Black male students’ responses to inequitable schooling. Educational Foundations, 26(1), 103-120.

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