Teaching and Advising Philosophy

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Courses

STUDENT ACTIVISM AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, 1930–PRESENT

"Student Activism and Social Movements" focuses on noteworthy protest events, social movements, and social movement organizations from early 20th through early 21st centuries (e.g., Civil Rights, Gay Liberation, Ethnic Studies, Movement for Black Lives, and DREAMers). The course is also concerned with engaging student activism at the intersection of digital media and social change. 

 ADMINISTRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

"Administration in Higher Education" prepares students to be principled and effective administrative leaders, particularly in urban colleges and universities that serve large numbers of first–generation, low-income, and racially minoritized students. As a higher education concentration course for students who have completed their core coursework, the class is conducted as a comprehensive review of the nature and structures of contemporary administrative work in colleges and universities.

CREATING COMMUNITIES OF INTEREST

"Creating Communities of Interest"  is designed to give students a conceptual framework for understanding and solving problems that arise in postsecondary school contexts. Using case studies of professional scenarios, students engage in analytical exercises from the perspectives of multiple higher education stakeholders. Building upon practices of practitioner inquiry, students engage higher education scholarship to develop empirically-based and socially just solutions. 

 

RESEARCH METHODS & DATA ANALYSIS

"Research Methods & Data Analysis" aims to provide students with the epistemological foundations and basic skills for 1) conducting empirical research, and 2) interpreting data to address their professional needs, interests, and problems. More specifically, students learn about the nature of research, various data collection and analytical approaches, how to identify and access credible scholarship, and how to critically consume research reported by public sources. 

SOCIAL CHANGE, DIFFERENCE AND ACCESS TO SCHOOLING

"Social Change, Difference, and Access to Schooling" examines the relationship symbiotic between education and society. This course is grounded in educational theory and practice from sociological, political, and societal perspectives for the purpose of understanding the complexities of public schooling in United States at various levels of geographic context. Intractable issues blocking access to quality education in urban, high-needs areas are examined across classifications race, gender, sexuality, and class. Educational change will be examined from historical and contemporary perspectives, with emphasis on the potential of current efforts.

THE POLITICS OF DIFFERENCE

"The Politics of Difference" explores the changing nature of students’ socio-academic experiences on college and university campuses, specifically focusing on three related domains: the historical and contemporary foundations of relationships of power; the resulting disparities and sociocultural diversity of human experiences; and sociopolitical resistance within higher education and its social contexts. Students are encouraged to critically reflect on their own social locations within broader systems and structures of power and domination.